Coverart for item
The Resource Rightful heritage : Franklin D. Roosevelt and the land of America, Douglas Brinkley

Rightful heritage : Franklin D. Roosevelt and the land of America, Douglas Brinkley

Label
Rightful heritage : Franklin D. Roosevelt and the land of America
Title
Rightful heritage
Title remainder
Franklin D. Roosevelt and the land of America
Statement of responsibility
Douglas Brinkley
Creator
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Douglas Brinkley's Wilderness Warrior celebrated Theodore Roosevelt's spirit of outdoor exploration and bold vision. Now Brinkley turns his attention to another indefatigable environmental leader--Theodore's distant cousin Franklin Delano Roosevelt--chronicling his essential yet undersung legacy as the founder of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) and the premier protector of America's public lands. FDR built state park systems and scenic roadways from scratch. Through his leadership, pristine landscapes such as the Great Smokies, the Everglades, Joshua Tree, the Olympics, Big Bend, and the Channel Islands were forever saved. Brinkley traces FDR's love for the natural world back to his youth spent exploring the Hudson River Valley and birdwatching. Forestry would soon become a consuming passion. As America's president from 1933 to 1945, Roosevelt, a consummate political strategist, established hundreds of federal migratory bird refuges and spearheaded the modern movement to protect endangered species. He deftly positioned his conservation goals as economic policy to combat the severe unemployment of the Great Depression. During its seven-year existence, the CCC put nearly three million young men to work on conservation projects--including planting trees, national park preservation, pollution control, and grasslands restoration. Rightful Heritage is an epic chronicle that is both an irresistible portrait of FDR's unrivaled passion and drive and an indispensable analysis that skillfully illuminates the tension between business and nature--exploiting our natural resources and conserving them. Within the narrative are capsule biographies of such environmental warriors as Eleanor Roosevelt, Harold Ickes, and Aldo Leopold.--Adapted from dust jacket
Pace
Writing style
Review
  • /* Starred Review */ Brinkley (The Quiet World), a professor of history at Rice University, succeeds in showing that F.D.R. should be remembered for his extraordinary, often unsung role as a great conservationist, particularly of public lands. From childhood, Roosevelt was taken by the natural surroundings of his Hudson River home, and as he emerged to greatness he never lost his interest in preserving natural habitats as state and national parks, wildlife refuges, monuments, and forests—especially those lands near American cities. Brinkley, who in Wilderness Warrior wrote about Theodore Roosevelt's outdoorsmanship, makes a solid, if mostly unstated, case that F.D.R.'s conservationist record is as important as his cousin's. Brinkley also addresses the many people who joined F.D.R. in his environmental passions as he covers the lands the president and his administration set aside. He also shows how F.D.R., in his wartime presidency, was moving toward what Brinkley terms "global conservation." The book's detail can be overwhelming and, as with many works of modern American history, it's mostly narrative without a strong point of view, save for Brinkley's evident and justifiable admiration for F.D.R.'s achievements. But Brinkley's book adds significantly to knowledge of F.D.R. as both man and president, and ranks among the best books on this major historical figure. (Mar.)
			 --Staff (Reviewed 02/01/2016) (Publishers Weekly, vol 263, issue 05, p)
  • Renowned presidential historian and television commentator Brinkley (history, Rice Univ.) is author of innumerable books including The Wilderness Warrior, that recount Theodore Roosevelt's role in environmental preservation. Here he focuses on the leadership of Franklin Roosevelt (1882–1945) in the Civilian Conservation Corps, which restored and reforested the land and established dozens of park systems and scenic roadways. FDR was motivated by both his congenital love for nature and his acute political instincts to alleviate unemployment during the Great Depression, combining conservation policy with his overall economic strategy. He also benefited from the advice of his wife, Eleanor, politicians Harold Ickes and Gifford Pinchot, and Supreme Court justice William O. Douglas. Brinkley further studies less-examined figures such as the influential Rosalie Edge, a New York socialite and suffragist who lobbied the Audubon Society and managed the Emergency Conservation Committee. As with Theodore, FDR's policies navigated between practical uses of land and pristine protection. VERDICT With an accessible writing style, Brinkley crafts a detailed study that will attract legions of faithful readers. Scholars will savor the author's meticulous annotations in addition to endnotes highlighting a lesser-studied aspect of Franklin's legacy of governmental action, which is also briefly addressed in FDR and the Environment, edited by D. Woolner and H. Henderson. [See Prepub Alert, 9/28/15.] --Frederick J. Augustyn Jr. (Reviewed 02/15/2016) (Library Journal, vol 141, issue 3, p119)
  • Brinkley (History/Rice Univ.; Cronkite, 2012, etc.) returns with the provocative argument that Theodore Roosevelt was not the only environmentalist in the Roosevelt clan—far from it. "There was never a eureka moment that transformed Franklin D. Roosevelt into a dyed-in-the-wool forest conservationist," writes the author at the opening of this book. If there were, perhaps it would be at the Chicago World's Fair of 1893, when the 11-year-old boy studied the thousands of specimens of flora and fauna on display, ardently taking in "the nucleus of Chicago's Field Museum of Natural History." Having grown up with an interest in nature, and especially in birds, FDR took time as an officeholder in New York to preserve state lands and create parks; among his campaigns was one to convert the entire Catskills Mountains region into a protected conservation district, if not a state park, that mixed private and public ownership. As governor of New York, he assembled his first "brain trusts," and among the first of these was one devoted to forestry and agronomy. As president, he famously initiated such environmental programs as the Civilian Conservation Corps, using an earlier idea of "forestry as work-relief" to gain bipartisan support for other planks of the New Deal. In his biography of the secretary, T.H. Watkins gave Interior Secretary Harold Ickes most of the credit for the principal environmental accomplishments of the FDR administrations, but Brinkley makes clear that Roosevelt was there at the creation and took a personal interest and lobbied hard for his proposals. Not all of them succeeded, notes the author: of a proposed "national shoreline parks" measure, for instance, only one of a dozen sites, Cape Hatteras, came under national protection. Even so, dozens of grasslands, game refuges, forests, and other conservation units came into the commonweal thanks to FDR's work. Overlong, as are so many of Brinkley's books, but a brightly written, highly useful argument, especially in a time when the public domain is under siege.(Kirkus Reviews, February 1, 2016)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10473071
Cataloging source
BTCTA
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Brinkley, Douglas
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
  • plates
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Roosevelt, Franklin D.
  • Civilian Conservation Corps (U.S.)
  • Conservation of natural resources
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
Franklin D. Roosevelt and the land of America
Label
Rightful heritage : Franklin D. Roosevelt and the land of America, Douglas Brinkley
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 638-717) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Content type code
  • txt
  • sti
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Contents
Part one: The education of a Hudson River conservationist, 1882-1932. "All that is in me goes back to the Hudson" ; "I just wish I could be at home to help mark the trees" ; "He knew every tree, every rock, and every stream" ; "Wise use" ; "Nothing like Mother Nature" ; "A twice-born man" -- Part two: New Deal conservation, 1933-1936. "They've made the good earth better" ; "He did not wait to ask questions, but simply said that it should be done" ; "Roosevelt is my shepherd" ; "The year of the National Park" ; "A duck for every puddle" ; "Sooner or later, you are likely to meet the sign of the flying goose" ; "We are going to conserve soil, conserve water, and conserve life" -- Part three: Conservation expansion, 1937-1939. "While you're gittin', git a-plenty" ; "I hope the son-of-a-bitch who logged that is roasting in hell" ; "Perpetuated for posterity" ; "To benefit wildlife" -- Part four: World War II and global conservation, 1940-1945. "An abundance of wild things" ; "The army must find a different nesting place!" ; "Conservation is a basis of permanent peace" -- Epilogue: "Where the sundial stands" -- Appendix: National Park system areas affected under reorganization of August 10, 1933 ; National Wildlife Refuges established under Franklin D. Roosevelt, 1933-1945 ; National Parks and National Monuments created by Franklin D. Roosevelt following the reorganization of August 10, 1933 ; Establishment and modification of National Forest boundaries by Franklin D. Roosevelt, March 1933 to April 1945 ; The nine Civilian Conservation Corps areas : Civilian Conservation Corps-- basic facts
Dimensions
24 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
viii, 744 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates
Isbn
9780062089236
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations, maps
Stock number
BRO-adap20160311-102
System control number
  • (OCoLC)ocn912382535
  • (OCoLC)912382535
  • 422309
Label
Rightful heritage : Franklin D. Roosevelt and the land of America, Douglas Brinkley
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 638-717) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Content type code
  • txt
  • sti
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Contents
Part one: The education of a Hudson River conservationist, 1882-1932. "All that is in me goes back to the Hudson" ; "I just wish I could be at home to help mark the trees" ; "He knew every tree, every rock, and every stream" ; "Wise use" ; "Nothing like Mother Nature" ; "A twice-born man" -- Part two: New Deal conservation, 1933-1936. "They've made the good earth better" ; "He did not wait to ask questions, but simply said that it should be done" ; "Roosevelt is my shepherd" ; "The year of the National Park" ; "A duck for every puddle" ; "Sooner or later, you are likely to meet the sign of the flying goose" ; "We are going to conserve soil, conserve water, and conserve life" -- Part three: Conservation expansion, 1937-1939. "While you're gittin', git a-plenty" ; "I hope the son-of-a-bitch who logged that is roasting in hell" ; "Perpetuated for posterity" ; "To benefit wildlife" -- Part four: World War II and global conservation, 1940-1945. "An abundance of wild things" ; "The army must find a different nesting place!" ; "Conservation is a basis of permanent peace" -- Epilogue: "Where the sundial stands" -- Appendix: National Park system areas affected under reorganization of August 10, 1933 ; National Wildlife Refuges established under Franklin D. Roosevelt, 1933-1945 ; National Parks and National Monuments created by Franklin D. Roosevelt following the reorganization of August 10, 1933 ; Establishment and modification of National Forest boundaries by Franklin D. Roosevelt, March 1933 to April 1945 ; The nine Civilian Conservation Corps areas : Civilian Conservation Corps-- basic facts
Dimensions
24 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
viii, 744 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates
Isbn
9780062089236
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations, maps
Stock number
BRO-adap20160311-102
System control number
  • (OCoLC)ocn912382535
  • (OCoLC)912382535
  • 422309

Library Locations

    • Columbus Public LibraryBorrow it
      3000 Macon Road, Columbus, GA, 31906, US
      32.4769285 -84.9441
    • North Columbus Public LibraryBorrow it
      5689 Armour Road, Columbus, GA, 31909, US
      32.528633 -84.953102
Processing Feedback ...