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The Resource The people and the president : America's conversation with FDR, [compiled by] Lawrence W. Levine and Cornelia R. Levine

The people and the president : America's conversation with FDR, [compiled by] Lawrence W. Levine and Cornelia R. Levine

Label
The people and the president : America's conversation with FDR
Title
The people and the president
Title remainder
America's conversation with FDR
Statement of responsibility
[compiled by] Lawrence W. Levine and Cornelia R. Levine
Title variation
people and the president
Title variation remainder
Americas conversation with FDR
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
"In 1933, Franklin Delano Roosevelt began a series of Fireside Chats over the radio in which he shared his hopes and plans with the American people and invited them to "tell me your troubles."" "The invitation was unprecedented and the response tremendous. Millions of letters flooded the White House mailroom from farmers, workers, businessmen, salesmen, housewives, the retired, the unemployed, and people of all races and ethnicities in big cities and small towns throughout the country."--Jacket
Review
  • FDR delivered a total of 31 "Fireside Chat" radio addresses during his presidency, the first just one week after taking office in 1933. At the end of each chat, he invited his listeners to write and tell him their concerns. McArthur Award–winning historian Lawrence Levine (The Opening of the American Mind ) and his wife, Cornelia, an independent scholar, here assemble a representative sample of the American people's responses, arranged chronologically through 1945. Set into historical context by the Levines, the letters range from the engaging to the banal. Of course, the critical correspondence (of which there is plenty) makes for far more interesting reading than do the fawning letters of approval, of which there are also plenty. "I would feel more confident if you didn't have so many smart alex young Jews and Irish around you," wrote a farmer in 1940. "I am amazed that after the 'pump priming' you have already poured into the Country you should have nothing better to offer than a repetition..." wrote a North Carolina conservative in '38. And then we have this, from 1942: "When you talk so glibly of drafting our... boys, it is absolute proof that you are war-mad." Perhaps a few of these missives, such as the several bearing asinine poems written to honor the president, should have been left to decay in the files of the FDR Library. Overall, however, the letters—comprised variously of love, spite, wit and bigotry—combine to offer a new and intriguing lens through which to view FDR and his America. 6 b&w photos not seen by PW. (June) --Staff (Reviewed April 15, 2002) (Publishers Weekly, vol 249, issue 15, p49)
  • Franklin Delano Roosevelt is widely considered by scholars as the father of the modern presidency. His ability to transform the office from one that responded to policy created by Congress to one that initiated public policy was due in no small part to his mastery of the new medium of radio. In this fine volume, award-winning historian Lawrence Levine (The Opening of the American Mind ) and independent scholar Cornelia Levine present a sample of letters written by Americans from all walks of life in response to each of Roosevelt's "Fireside Chats." In an excellent introduction, the authors place the chats and the correspondence they generated in a larger context. FDR delivered 31 such talks, spaced unevenly over all 12 years of his presidency. Each chapter contains a summary of the chat with accompanying commentary, followed by a representative sample of letters received by the White House in response to the talk. These letters "help re-create a conversation between FDR and the American people." Indeed, these fascinating and touching letters provide much more insight into the lives of average Americans of that time than simply reading a historical account of the period. Recommended for all libraries.—Thomas J. Baldino, Wilkes Univ., Wilkes-Barre, PA --Thomas J. Baldino (Reviewed April 15, 2002) (Library Journal, vol 127, issue 7, p105)
  • An illuminating collection in which Americans talk back after listening to Franklin Delano Roosevelt's famed fireside chats."Tell me your troubles," FDR invited after his first chat on March 4, 1933, and so the nation did, flooding Washington with millions of letters—most of which, note historian Lawrence Levine (The Opening of the American Mind, 1996) and independent scholar Cornelia Levine, were read, many of which were responded to, and all of which were carefully stored away in the White House archives. Wading through this sea of correspondence was surely a daunting task, but the Levines have exercised fine judgment in selecting the hundreds of texts that make up these pages, using them, often inventive language and all, to shed light on historical events now buried away in textbooks. Following a succession of bank failures that plagued the early days of his first term, for instance, Roosevelt urged his listeners to give the shored-up system their confidence: "I can assure you, my friends, that it is safer to keep your money in a reopened bank than it is to keep it under the mattress." His listeners responded, in turn, with sentiments such as, "bankers who have betrayed trusts imposed in them shall be brought to trial and punished," or, "I felt heartily ashamed that I did not vote for you last November and I sincerely hope your acts will be successful in relieving our country of at least some of it's present depressing influences so that I will feel even more ashamed of myself." The letters were not always so positive, and many that the Levines reproduce take Roosevelt to task over such matters as allying the US with England against Germany ("Yanks are not coming we will not die for Wall Street," one telegram reads), advocating peacetime military conscription, and failing to act on Jim Crow discrimination laws. Almost all are respectful, however—even the few certifiably loony ones.Consistently interesting, the Levines' gathering of letters will be useful to any student of 20th-century American history. (Kirkus Reviews, April 1, 2002)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
298804
Cataloging source
DLC
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Levine, Lawrence W
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Roosevelt, Franklin D.
  • Presidents
  • American letters
  • United States
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
America's conversation with FDR
Label
The people and the president : America's conversation with FDR, [compiled by] Lawrence W. Levine and Cornelia R. Levine
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 573-594) and indexes
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Preface -- Introduction -- I. Nadir : 1933-1936 -- Closing the banks ; New Deal ; First hundred days ; Relief, recovery, reform and reconstruction ; Order out of chaos ; Protecting the weak ; Orderly economic democracy -- II. Continuing crisis : 1937-1938 -- Packing the Supreme Court ; Balancing the human budget ; Combatting renewed depression ; Purging the Democratic Party -- III. Looking abroad : 1939-1941 -- True neutrality ; Approaching storm ; Great arsenal of democracy ; Unlimited national emergency ; Attack on the USS Greer ; Pearl Harbor -- IV. America at war : 1942-1945 -- Battle ground of civilization ; Hard work and sorrow and blood ; Folks back home ; Coal Strike ; GI Bill ; Economic bill of rights ; Planning for peace -- Epilogue -- Appendix : Note on the Fireside Chats
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
xii, 612 pages
Isbn
9780807055106
Isbn Type
(acid-free paper)
Lccn
2002002263
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
ocm49829974
Label
The people and the president : America's conversation with FDR, [compiled by] Lawrence W. Levine and Cornelia R. Levine
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 573-594) and indexes
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Preface -- Introduction -- I. Nadir : 1933-1936 -- Closing the banks ; New Deal ; First hundred days ; Relief, recovery, reform and reconstruction ; Order out of chaos ; Protecting the weak ; Orderly economic democracy -- II. Continuing crisis : 1937-1938 -- Packing the Supreme Court ; Balancing the human budget ; Combatting renewed depression ; Purging the Democratic Party -- III. Looking abroad : 1939-1941 -- True neutrality ; Approaching storm ; Great arsenal of democracy ; Unlimited national emergency ; Attack on the USS Greer ; Pearl Harbor -- IV. America at war : 1942-1945 -- Battle ground of civilization ; Hard work and sorrow and blood ; Folks back home ; Coal Strike ; GI Bill ; Economic bill of rights ; Planning for peace -- Epilogue -- Appendix : Note on the Fireside Chats
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
xii, 612 pages
Isbn
9780807055106
Isbn Type
(acid-free paper)
Lccn
2002002263
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
ocm49829974

Library Locations

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      3000 Macon Road, Columbus, GA, 31906, US
      32.4769285 -84.9441
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