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The Resource The quickest kid in Clarksville, by Pat Zietlow Miller ; illustrations by Frank Morrison

The quickest kid in Clarksville, by Pat Zietlow Miller ; illustrations by Frank Morrison

Label
The quickest kid in Clarksville
Title
The quickest kid in Clarksville
Statement of responsibility
by Pat Zietlow Miller ; illustrations by Frank Morrison
Creator
Contributor
Author
Illustrator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Growing up in the segregated town of Clarksville, Tennessee, in the 1960s, Alta's family cannot afford to buy her new sneakers--but she still plans to attend the parade celebrating her hero Wilma Rudolph's three Olympic gold medals
Tone
Character
Review
  • Grades K-2 Alta is the fastest runner in Clarksville, so an imminent visit to town by African American Olympian Wilma Rudolph could not be more exciting. But then Charmaine appears, sporting brand-new sneakers and an aura of confidence that rattles Alta. The girls challenge each other to a few races, each winning and losing, intensifying the competition. Soon enough, though, the competition turns to collaboration and friendship. The girls make one last dash, to Rudolph’s welcome-home parade, where they collapse and observe, “There are flags. Bands. Noise. / Black faces. And white ones.” Alta and Charmaine are inspired by Rudolph’s athletic accomplishments, but her success, as Charmaine points out, includes the efforts of a relay team. What begins as a story of individualism expands to embrace the notion of teamwork and unification, bolstering Rudolph’s influence on the girls and on history itself. Morrison’s bold, expressive watercolors capture the flavor of the era (1960s) with a contemporary tone that will make this story feel strikingly current. -- Chaudhri, Amina (Reviewed 2/1/2016) (Booklist, vol 112, number 11, p46)
  • In 1960, African-American runner Wilma Rudolph won three gold medals in the Olympic Games. In a story about teamwork and determination, Miller (Sharing the Bread) imagines the children Rudolph might have inspired. Alta lives in Rudolph's hometown of Clarksville, Tenn., which will be honoring the runner's victories in an upcoming parade (an author's note explains that the parade was the first major non-segregated event in Clarksville's history). Alta adores Rudolph and considers herself to be Clarksville's fastest kid, until she meets Charmaine, who has a brand-new pair of running shoes and boasts, "I'm faster than anyone." Several one-on-one races later, Charmaine's strutting confidence continues to irk Alta, whose family can't afford new shoes. But the girls overcome their initial prickliness in order to race—together—to the parade with a celebratory banner in tow. Working in watercolor, Morrison (Little Melba and Her Big Trombone) gives the girls abundant personality as they size one another up with laserlike glares. Miller does the same, narrating from Alta's no-nonsense point of view. Ages 5–8. Author's agent: Erin Murphy Literary Agency, Ammi-Joan Paquette. Illustrator's agent: Lori Nowicki, Painted Words. (Feb.)
			 --Staff (Reviewed 02/08/2016) (Publishers Weekly, vol 263, issue 06, p)
  • Two little girls compete to meet a local hero. It's 1961. Tomorrow there'll be a big parade in Clarksville, Tennessee, honoring hometown girl Wilma Rudolph, "the fastest woman in the world" and winner of multiple Olympic gold medals. Alta, along with friends Dee Dee and Little Mo, likes to pretend that she's the fastest woman in the world and hopes to meet her idol. But there's a new girl in the neighborhood, Charmaine, with an abundance of attitude and a pair of beautiful new shoes, shoes "Like Wilma's," with stripes down the sides and laces so white they glow. Alta challenges her to a race, to the mailbox and back. Alta wins, thinking "Wil-Ma Ru-Dolph" all the while. Charmaine suggests another run, to the corner; this time, she wins. Walking away, Alta's foot hits a rock, and the rock hits Charmaine. They almost fight. But the next day, Alta is struggling to carry the big banner for Wilma when Charmaine struts by. In a turnaround, she helps out, and all four find a perfect spot to watch. Wilma Rudolph smiles at the new friends and waves. Miller's girl-power story also tucks in some nice observations on friendship. Morrison's watercolor illustrations are vibrant and evocative, capturing the thrill and pride in this African-American community for its famous daughter. A helpful author's note adds context. Sweet and inspiring. (Picture book. 5-8)(Kirkus Reviews, January 15, 2016)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10469183
Cataloging source
NJQ/DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Miller, Pat Zietlow
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
Intended audience
300
Intended audience source
Lexile
Interest level
LG
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • 0
  • 2
Reading level
2.9
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1971-
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Morrison, Frank
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Study program name
Accelerated Reader
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Rudolph, Wilma
  • Rudolph, Wilma
  • African American girls
  • Role models
  • Parades
  • Segregation
  • African American girls
  • Parades
  • Role models
  • Segregation
  • Clarksville (Tenn.)
  • Tennessee
Target audience
primary
Label
The quickest kid in Clarksville, by Pat Zietlow Miller ; illustrations by Frank Morrison
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Content type code
  • txt
  • sti
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Dimensions
29 cm
Extent
36 unnumbered pages
Isbn
9781452129365
Lccn
2014018358
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
color illustrations
Stock number
  • BRO-copy20160413-069
  • BRO-cust20180605-060
System control number
  • (OCoLC)ocn883962328
  • (OCoLC)883962328
Label
The quickest kid in Clarksville, by Pat Zietlow Miller ; illustrations by Frank Morrison
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Content type code
  • txt
  • sti
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Dimensions
29 cm
Extent
36 unnumbered pages
Isbn
9781452129365
Lccn
2014018358
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
color illustrations
Stock number
  • BRO-copy20160413-069
  • BRO-cust20180605-060
System control number
  • (OCoLC)ocn883962328
  • (OCoLC)883962328

Library Locations

    • Columbus Public LibraryBorrow it
      3000 Macon Road, Columbus, GA, 31906, US
      32.4769285 -84.9441
    • Cusseta - Chattahoochee Public LibraryBorrow it
      262 Broad Street, Cusseta, GA, 31805, US
      32.308074 -84.786131
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